Catch-22 of our era

The screen on my wife’s iPhone was shattered this week and she had not backed up the photos. The phone seems to still be functioning otherwise so we plugged it into the computer to try to back it up but it requires us to unlock the phone and we can’t enter in the password. My wife refused to pay the 99 cents or whatever Apple charges to increase the disk space for iCloud to automatically back up the phone, so I suggested we just pay the ransom money and then the phone will back up automatically. I currently pay both Apple and Dropbox extortion money. However, since she hadn’t logged onto iCloud in maybe ever, it sent a code to her phone under the two-factor authentication scheme to type in to the website, but of course we can’t see it on her broken screen so that idea is done. We called Apple and they said you could try to change the number on her iCloud account to my phone but that was two days ago and they haven’t complied. So my wife gave up and tried to order a new phone. Under the new system of her university, which provides her phone, she can get a phone if she logs onto this site to request it. The site requires VPN and in order to get VPN she needs to, you guessed it, type in a code sent to her phone. So you need a functioning phone to order a new phone. Basically, tech products are not very good. Software still kind of sucks and is not really improving. My Apple Mac is much worse now than it was 10 years ago. I still have trouble projecting stuff on a screen. I will never get into a self driving car made by any tech company. I’ll wait for Toyota to make one; my (Japanese) car always works (my Audi was terrible).

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2 thoughts on “Catch-22 of our era

  1. I read a review of the Tesla that said it is basically a giant IPhone (https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2018/08/02/behind-wheel-tesla-model-its-giant-iphone-better-worse). Almost everything is on a center touchscreen. Sounds like you’d hate it!

    I think one difference between Silicon Valley and traditional industry is that, for the most part, the worst that can happen with a Silicon Valley product is that it crashes. Which isn’t so bad if it’s an app. And it many cases it may not be worth spending the time building provably safe or secure products when the downside is low. But when the same approach is used to build things with potentially terrible outcomes (basically anything in meatspace), there is a potential market failure as people rush to buy the slickest products, but are then subject to e.g. coordinated attacks from hackers.

    Like

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